March Wrap Up & Haul!

Everything I read and bought in March!

Wrap Up

Books I Read:

Other Posts:

Here is my completed ACMC Readathon MAGIC board:

I didn’t finish two of the books I was planning on, but I’m still quite happy with how it went!

Book Haul

I’m so excited to get to these! I was so pleasantly surprised by Assassin’s Apprentice, so I immediately ordered the next book. I wasn’t sure I would even get The Poison Song because it was out of stock, but I’m so happy I’ll be able to finish this series soon.


What was your favorite read of March?

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Things I Would Love to See in Upcoming ACOTAR Books!

Since finishing A Court of Silver Flames, I’ve been thinking about what I want from the rest of the series. There are projected to be two more full length novels and possibly another novella (at least). I wouldn’t say these are predictions necessarily, so they won’t be backed up with facts from the series, but these are just some things I would like to see. As I was writing these points out, it really started to sound like I am dragging this series…which I’m totally not! It is still one of my favorites and SJM is one of my favorite writers, but no series is perfect.

*THIS POST CONTAINS SPOILERS FOR THE ENTIRE A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES SERIES, INCLUDING A COURT OF SILVER FLAMES*

Since finishing A Court of Silver Flames, I’ve been thinking about what I want from the rest of the series. There are projected to be two more full length novels and possibly another novella (at least). I wouldn’t say these are predictions necessarily, so they won’t be backed up with facts from the series, but these are just some things I would like to see. As I was writing these points out, it really started to sound like I am dragging this series…which I’m totally not! It is still one of my favorites and SJM is one of my favorite writers, but no series is perfect.

NO MORE MATES.

Please. PLEASE. I’m so tired of mates. It’s made out to be this super rare thing, but we already have three pairs of mates among the main characters. I really was hoping Nesta and Cassian wouldn’t be mates, but of course they were. SJM even mentioned that being mates doesn’t mean those characters have to be together, but she hasn’t shown that.

The single reason that I like Elain and Azriel as a couple is because they AREN’T mates. It would be a clear rejection of the finality of mates, but unfortunately, it looks like Azriel and Gwyn are going to end up being mates, or at least involved. Since SJM really doesn’t like to keep anyone single, I would assume that means that Elain and Lucien is kind of inevitable as well.

Along the line of mates, I am sick of possessive males. This didn’t feel like an issue in Throne of Glass, but it feels like every male character in this series is a possessive bastard. Rhys in ACOSF drove me over the edge, and I’m sick of it.

MORE EXPLORATION OF THE WORLD.

I am getting a little sick of Prythian, especially the Night Court. I would love to see characters go to the regions in the east for more than a few pages. I also think it would cool to go to Hybern. Since the King was defeated, what’s going on over there? I just think there is a lot of potential for more cool stories or creatures, which actually brings me into my next point!

MORE CREATURES OR NON-HIGH FAE CHARACTERS.

One of the things I loved about the first book was all of the creatures in the Spring Court! I loved that there were characters like Alis, the Suriel, the Attor, and naga. I thought all of those were so cool. There were some others throughout the series, like Bryaxis, but I want more! Having all the main characters all be High Fae, or vaguely High Fae is getting boring. I want creatures and things I’ve never seen before, not an endless stream of perfect and beautiful High Fae.

I can see how SJM kind of tried to incorporate this with Gwyn’s quarter-water nymph heritage, but that’s not enough for me.

DIVERSITY.

None of the main characters are anything more than an ambiguous “tan”. Mor likes women, but that has only ever been discussed like once, in 4.5 books. SJM needs to step it up. It is unacceptable for a series that is still ongoing and an author with MANY books under her belt to still be writing such straight, white characters in this day and age.


Do you agree with any of these? What else would you like to see in the future ACOTAR books?

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ACMC Readathon TBR!

I never do readathons, mostly because I find them stressful and I’m a mood reader, but this one is a whole month and most of the books I already want to read fit the categories! Also, it is hosted by one of my faves, Elliot Brooks, so I’m in. Check out her announcement video here!

I never do readathons (or TBRs for that matter), mostly because I find them stressful and I’m a mood reader, but this one is a whole month and most of the books I already want to read fit the categories! Also, it is hosted by one of my faves, Elliot Brooks, so I’m in. Check out her announcement video here!

The theme of the readathon is animal companions and mythological creatures, even if they aren’t a super prominent part of the plot. There are some different categories that serve as prompts:
– Type of animal/creature (land, sky, sea, beyond)
– Age range (adult, YA/middle grade)
– Area of inspiration (African, European, Asian, Indigenous, and South American)
– Representation (mental health, disability, and LGBTQ+)

These are all sorted onto “MAGIC” cards (Bingo, basically), so if you complete a row, you’ve completed the readathon. Here is the MAGIC card I am going for:

On to the books! I have three different tiers of books, based on priority to complete the readathon.

Highest Priority

Flamefall (The Aurelian Cycle #2) by Rosaria Munda
– YA
– LGBTQ+ rep
– sky

Assassin’s Apprentice (The Farseer Trilogy #1) by Robin Hobb
– adult
– mental health rep
– European
– land

When the Tiger Came Down the Mountain (The Singing Hills Cycle #2) by Nghi Vo
– adult
– LGBTQ+ rep
– Asian
– land

Medium Priority

The Bitter Twins (The Winnowing Flame Trilogy #2) by Jen Williams
– adult
– LGBTQ+ rep
– sky

The Bone Shard Daughter (The Drowning Empire #1) by Andrea Stewart
– adult
– LGBTQ+ rep
– Asian

Lowest Priority

A Dowry of Blood by S.T. Gibson
– adult
– LGBTQ+ rep
– beyond

Fireborne (The Aurelian Cycle #1) by Rosaria Munda (reread)
– sky
– YA

Green Rider (Green Rider #1) by Kristen Britain (reread)
– adult
– land
– European

The Deep by Rivers Solomon
– African
– sea
– LGBTQ+ rep
– adult

Here’s is what my goal is for my MAGIC card:

The pink boxes are my primary goals, while blue is a secondary goal. You can double up on prompts for this readathon, which is why I could technically just read my highest priority books and still complete that pink column.

I think this is a totally reasonable goal for me! Three of the books are short and two are rereads. Also, given that it is an entire month, it gives me the flexibility to still mood read and even read books outside of this list, while still leaving time to get these done.

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February Wrap Up, Haul, & Update!

I have been doing an absolutely awful job at keeping up with reviews and posts that I want to write. I’ve missed 5 or 6 reviews over the past couple months, so I am going to do a mini review post, including all of those. That way, I don’t have to stress myself out that they still aren’t done, and I can move onto reviews that are fresh in my mind! I want to keep on top of my writing schedule better, so I think this will help.

I have been doing an absolutely awful job at keeping up with reviews and posts that I want to write. I’ve missed 5 or 6 reviews over the past couple months, so I am going to do a mini review post, including all of those. That way, I don’t have to stress myself out that they still aren’t done, and I can move onto reviews that are fresh in my mind! I want to keep on top of my writing schedule better, so I think this will help.

Wrap Up

* these will be in the mini review post I mentioned! The rest that aren’t linked will (hopefully) be getting full reviews

Book Haul

I bought some highly anticipated sequels, as well as some starts to series and some standalones! I really can’t pick which I am most excited to read!

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Underrated Book Recommendations!

I want to shout out some books that I don’t see enough people talk about and think deserve more attention! “Underrated” is such a loose definition, so I chose books with less than 4,000 ratings on Goodreads. Also, if you’re tired of me recommending Laura Wood and Akemi Dawn Bowman, prepare yourself ๐Ÿ™‚

I want to shout out some books that I don’t see enough people talk about and think deserve more attention! “Underrated” is such a loose definition, so I chose books with less than 4,000 ratings on Goodreads. Also, if you’re tired of me recommending Laura Wood and Akemi Dawn Bowman, prepare yourself ๐Ÿ™‚

A Snowfall of Silver by Laura Wood

YA, historical

256 ratings on Goodreads

A snow-dusted love story.

In the Autumn of 1931, eighteen-year-old Freya Trevelyan runs away from her home in Cornwall to follow her dream of becoming an actress. When she is invited to join a theatrical company about to head out on tour, Freya thinks the path to success is clear, and, amidst all the glamour and bustle of stage life, she finds – for the first time – a place to belong. But can reality ever live up to her expectations? What if her life – and falling in love – turn out to be nothing like she planned? An enchanting coming of age romance about following your dreams – even when they aren’t quite what you expected.

This book was just such a lovely read! Laura Wood has a way of writing such warm and light historical fiction.

How We Became Wicked by Alexander Yates

YA, Sci-fi, dystopian, thriller/horror

532 ratings on Goodreads

A plague, called Wicked, is pulsing through the world; and in its wake, itโ€™s dividing the population into thirds:

The WICKED: Already infected by the droves of Singers, the ultraviolet mosquito-like insects who carry the plague, the Wicked roam the world freely. They donโ€™t want for muchโ€”only to maim and dismember you. But donโ€™t worry: They always ask politely first.

The TRUE: The True live in contained, isolated communities. Theyโ€™re the lucky ones; they found safety from the Singers. And while the threat of the Wicked may not be eliminated, for the True, the threat has certainly been containedโ€ฆ

The VEXED: The Vexed are the truly fortunate onesโ€”they survived the sting of the Singers, leaving them immune. But theyโ€™re far from safe. The Vexed hold the key to a cure, and there are those who will do anything to get it.

This book was SUCH a fun time, so I’m surprised it doesn’t have more ratings! I’ve definitely included this in other recommendation posts, but I just love it. Though, if you are going to pick this up, be warned that it might not be the best idea currently with the state of the world.

Harley in the Sky by Akemi Dawn Bowman

YA, contemporary

1,082 ratings on Goodreads

Harley Milano has dreamed of being a trapeze artist for as long as she can remember. With parents who run a famous circus in Las Vegas, she spends almost every night in the big top watching their lead aerialist perform, wishing with all her soul that she could be up there herself one day.

After a huge fight with her parents, who continue to insist she go to school instead, Harley leaves home, betrays her family and joins the rival traveling circus Maison du Mystรจre. There, she is thrust into a world that is both brutal and beautiful, where she learns the value of hard work, passion and collaboration. But at the same time, Harley must come to terms with the truth of her family and her pastโ€”and reckon with the sacrifices she made and the people she hurt in order to follow her dreams. 

All of Akemi’s books have a focus on mental health, and this one is no different. Harley does always do the “right” thing, but seeing her learn from her mistakes and learn about herself made this book so good.

Under a Dancing Star by Laura Wood

YA, historical

1,084 ratings on Goodreads

In grey, 1930s England, Bea has grown up kicking against the conventions of the time, all the while knowing that she will one day have to marry someone her parents choose – someone rich enough to keep the family estate alive. But she longs for so much more – for adventure, excitement, travel, and maybe even romance.

When she gets the chance to spend the summer in Italy with her bohemian uncle and his fiancรฉe, a whole world is opened up to Bea – a world that includes Ben, a cocky young artist who just happens to be infuriatingly handsome too. Sparks fly between the quick-witted pair until one night, under the stars, a challenge is set: can Bea and Ben put aside their teasing and have the perfect summer romance?

With their new friends gleefully setting the rules for their fling, Bea and Ben can agree on one thing at least: they absolutely, positively will not, cannot fall in love…

A long, hot summer of kisses and mischief unfolds – but storm clouds are gathering across Europe, and home is calling. Every summer has to end – but for Bea, this might be just the beginning.

The atmosphere in this book was so good, I can still picture some of the scenes like I was there!

The Ninth Rain (The Winnowing Flame trilogy #1) by Jen Williams

Adult, fantasy

2,218 ratings on Goodreads

The great city of Ebora once glittered with gold. Now its streets are stalked by wolves. Tormalin the Oathless has no taste for sitting around waiting to die while the realm of his storied ancestors falls to pieces – talk about a guilt trip. Better to be amongst the living, where there are taverns full of women and wine.

When eccentric explorer, Lady Vincenza ‘Vintage’ de Grazon, offers him employment, he sees an easy way out. Even when they are joined by a fugitive witch with a tendency to set things on fire, the prospect of facing down monsters and retrieving ancient artefacts is preferable to the abomination he left behind.

But not everyone is willing to let the Eboran empire collapse, and the adventurers are quickly drawn into a tangled conspiracy of magic and war. For the Jure’lia are coming, and the Ninth Rain must fall…

This book was so strange but also SO enjoyable! I just finished it the other day, but I’m so excited to read the rest of the series once I can get my hands on it.

Summer Bird Blue by Akemi Dawn Bowman

YA, contemporary

2,701 ratings on Goodreads

Rumi Seto spends a lot of time worrying she doesnโ€™t have the answers to everything. What to eat, where to go, whom to love. But there is one thing she is absolutely sure ofโ€”she wants to spend the rest of her life writing music with her younger sister, Lea.

Then Lea dies in a car accident, and her mother sends her away to live with her aunt in Hawaii while she deals with her own grief. Now thousands of miles from home, Rumi struggles to navigate the loss of her sister, being abandoned by her mother, and the absence of music in her life. With the help of the โ€œboys next doorโ€โ€”a teenage surfer named Kai, who smiles too much and doesnโ€™t take anything seriously, and an eighty-year-old named George Watanabe, who succumbed to his own grief years agoโ€”Rumi attempts to find her way back to her music, to write the song she and Lea never had the chance to finish.

Aching, powerful, and unflinchingly honest, Summer Bird Blue explores big truths about insurmountable grief, unconditional love, and how to forgive even when it feels impossible.

Just thinking about this book makes me emotional, but even though it is truly about dealing with grief, I found it to be quite heartwarming as well.

A Sky Painted Gold by Laura Wood

YA, historical

2,750 ratings on Goodreads

Growing up in her sleepy Cornish village dreaming of being a writer, seventeen-year-old Lou has always wondered about the grand Cardew house which has stood empty for years. And when the owners arrive for the summer – a handsome, dashing brother and sister – Lou is quite swept off her feet and into a world of moonlit cocktail parties and glamour beyond her wildest dreams.

But, as she grows closer to the Cardews, is she abandoning her own ambitions… And is there something darker lurking at the heart of the Cardew family?

A gorgeously dreamy coming-of-age romance set against a stunning Gatsby-esque backdrop, this is perfect for fans of I Capture the Castle and Eva Ibbotson. 

If you’ve gotten to this point and couldn’t tell…I love Laura Wood’s books! This is the one that started my obsession with her writing for me.

Every Falling Star by Sungju Lee

YA, non-fiction, memoir

3,093 ratings on Goodreads

Every Falling Star, the first book to portray contemporary North Korea to a young audience, is the intense memoir of a North Korean boy named Sungju who is forced at age twelve to live on the streets and fend for himself. To survive, Sungju creates a gang and lives by thieving, fighting, begging, and stealing rides on cargo trains. Sungju richly re-creates his scabrous story, depicting what it was like for a boy alone to create a new family with his gang, his โ€œbrothersโ€; to be hungry and to fear arrest, imprisonment, and even execution. This riveting memoir allows young readers to learn about other cultures where freedoms they take for granted do not exist.

This is very different from everything else on this list. I have read multiple memoirs by people who have escaped North Korea, but this is the only one that is directed at younger audiences. It doesn’t shy away from anything though, but it is still an important and powerful read.

I’ll Be The One by Lyla Lee

YA, contemporary, romance

3,473 ratings on Goodreads

Skye Shin has heard it all. Fat girls shouldnโ€™t dance. Wear bright colors. Shouldnโ€™t call attention to themselves. But Skye dreams of joining the glittering world of K-Pop, and to do that, sheโ€™s about to break all the rules that society, the media, and even her own mother, have set for girls like her.

Sheโ€™ll challenge thousands of other performers in an internationally televised competition looking for the next K-pop star, and sheโ€™ll do it better than anyone else.

When Skye nails her audition, sheโ€™s immediately swept into a whirlwind of countless practices, shocking performances, and the drama that comes with reality TV. What she doesnโ€™t count on are the highly fat-phobic beauty standards of the Korean pop entertainment industry, her sudden media fame and scrutiny, or the sparks that soon fly with her fellow competitor, Henry Cho.

But Skye has her sights on becoming the worldโ€™s first plus-sized K-pop star, and that means winning the competitionโ€”without losing herself.

This was such a fun and cute book, but also challenges the idea that you need to be a certain way to follow your dreams. Even though it centers around K-pop, I think anyone could easily get into this book!

Fireborne by Rosaria Munda

YA, fantasy

3,676 ratings on Goodreads

Annie and Lee were just children when a brutal revolution changed their world, giving everyoneโ€”even the lowbornโ€”a chance to test into the governing class of dragonriders.

Now they are both rising stars in the new regime, despite backgrounds that couldnโ€™t be more different. Annieโ€™s lowborn family was executed by dragonfire, while Leeโ€™s aristocratic family was murdered by revolutionaries. Growing up in the same orphanage forged their friendship, and seven years of training have made them rivals for the top position in the dragonriding fleet.

But everything changes when survivors from the old regime surface, bent on reclaiming the city.

With war on the horizon and his relationship with Annie changing fast, Lee must choose to kill the only family he has left or to betray everything heโ€™s come to believe in. And Annie must decide whether to protect the boy she loves . . . or step up to be the champion her city needs.

From debut author Rosaria Munda comes a gripping adventure that calls into question which matters most: the family you were born into, or the one youโ€™ve chosen.

This was my favorite book out of the 123 books I read in 2020…does that speak for itself? I have to stop myself from rereading this book on a regular basis, I love it so much!


I’m curious, what are your favorite underrated books? I’m always looking for more hidden gems!

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January Wrap Up & Haul!

Everything I read and bought in January 2021!

Wrap Up

Other Posts

Book Haul

A lot of these books (actually…maybe all of them) were left over from Christmas that just didn’t arrive in time. I bought most of the 2020 releases that I hadn’t gotten to yet, so I haven’t actually bought more this month. It’s definitely going to take me a little bit to get through these!

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How Well Do These Books Actually Compare?

I see so many books compared to other books, authors, or franchises in order to market them, so I thought it would be fun to take a look at those and see if the comparisons actually made sense! I’ve definitely read books where the comparisons I’ve seen make no sense.

As a note, these comparisons are pulled directly from reviews on the book. This means that people who just pick a book solely based on what they read about it on the book will see these comparisons as well.

I see so many books compared to other books, authors, or franchises in order to market them, so I thought it would be fun to take a look at those and see if the comparisons actually made sense! I’ve definitely read books where the comparisons I’ve seen make no sense.

As a note, these comparisons are pulled directly from reviews on the book. This means that people who just pick a book solely based on what they read about it on the book will see these comparisons as well.

Warcross by Marie Lu

Compared to: The Hunger Games & World of Warcraft

I can see how the gaming element of World of Warcraft could be a good comparison, but I don’t necessarily think there is anything about WoW specifically that relates to this book. You could pick any MMORPG with fantasy elements and it would be a decent match. I actually just played WoW for the first time the other day, so I haven’t gotten into it much, but from what I remember of Warcross, the game in the book seems quite different, not to mention it’s VR/AR.

It took me a minute to understand the Hunger Games comparison…they are both games. Other than a futuristic society and the vague “game” element, I don’t think there is much to tie these two together.

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

Compared to: Romeo and Juliet, Gladiator, Game of Thrones

Although I haven’t seen the movie Gladiator, I think this could be a fair comparison. The description of the movie mentions fighting, slavery, and a fight for a throne, all of which are present in the book series. One big difference I can think of is that it doesn’t sound like there is any fantasy elements in the movie, whereas there definitely are in the book.

I also have not read Romeo and Juliet, but I think society is well enough aware of the plot at this point. I can definitely see the connection here! There is a romance in the book between two people on two very different sides, however, this is more society-based rather than familial like in Romeo and Juliet. One group is literally using the other as slaves, so it definitely is more intense than just two families hating each other.

And we have arrived at the inevitable…Game of Thrones. Going into this post, I knew I was going to have to discuss this because anything that has fantasy in it or is slightly dark or sexy has been compared to GoT. That being said, I can understand the comparison only because there are brutal elements of both. Otherwise, the plot, characters, settings, and themes completely different. Game of Thrones feels very political and the characters are more gray in their morality. AEITA doesn’t feel so political, and while the characters do have to make hard choices, it is generally pretty good versus evil.

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Compared to: The Hunger Games, Game of Thrones, Lord of the Flies, Ender’s Game

Okay, The Hunger Games. I can totally see the comparison here, as both feature a brutal, competition-esque game. I do feel like the dynamics are a bit different though, as The Hunger Games is made to be a spectacle and the point was to kill everyone else. In Red Rising, the training event was not made public (correct me if I’m wrong, it’s been awhile) and people could die, but it wasn’t necessarily encouraged to kill everyone.

Again for Game of Thrones, I think this has to do with brutality. Red Rising can be quite brutal, so I get that, but this book is sci-fi, not fantasy. I think the political element of Game of Thrones would be reasonably compared to the rest of this series, but this comparison was specifically on the first book, which is largely not focused on politics.

Lord of the Flies is an interesting one to me. On first glance, it made sense because youths fighting each other is common among the two, but after thinking about it, I don’t agree. Lord of the Flies is more of a situation where rules are abandoned and society breaks down, so they are just trying to survive. In Red Rising, the ‘game’ was a semi-controlled training exercise with a distinct goal outside of just surviving.

I’ve never read Ender’s Game, but I feel like I’ve learned a lot about it from hearing my brother talk about it non-stop. This is the only comparison that is actually hard sci-fi, so there’s at least a vague connection there. Ender’s Game is also a school type setting, but it’s definitely more structured than Red Rising. I think this is a fairly decent comparison and definitely the best out of the four!

The Queen of Blood by Sarah Beth Durst

Compared to: Throne of Glass

I’m a big fan of both series, but this was so funny to me! They are so completely different in my mind. I suppose they both have magic and royalty….but the tone, story, characters, and setting are all so different! The Queen of Blood feels a bit more nostalgic, like older fantasy, while Throne of Glass definitely leans into fun YA tropes. There is a competition in Throne of Glass, which I guess is vaguely similar to the school in The Queen of Blood, but I still don’t see a very strong connection. I enjoy them both, but for very different reasons.

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

Compared to: Sarah J. Maas, Holly Black, Maggie Stiefvater, Laini Taylor, Diana Wynne Jones

It’s interesting to me that this book is compared to so many other authors!

I can understand that Sarah J. Maas and Holly Black are in the mix because this book is about fae. There are courts in this book, similar to A Court of Thorns and Roses and the fae themselves are similar to The Cruel Prince. All three stories follow a human girl among immortal fae.

I think the Laini Taylor, Diana Wynne Jones, and Maggie Stiefvater comparisons are more for the writing and style. This book does have a whimsical kind of magic, which seems in line with how these authors write.

All in all, I don’t think these are bad comparisons really, but just having so many feels overwhelming. Those five authors are not very similar in my opinion, so having a book that is similar to all of them at once makes it confusing.


I may need to do a part two of this! These are just some of the books I found on my shelf that are compared to other things. What I learned from this is that comparisons may be a good place to start, but they definitely don’t give you the whole picture of a book. What other comparisons have you seen on books?

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2021 Reading Goals!

Happy 2021! I have some updated goals for this year to share! I’m going to kind of keep these a little relaxed because I don’t want to put too much pressure on myself and as 2020 showed us, you never know what is going to happen. I just want these to guide me, not confine me.

Happy 2021! I have some updated goals for this year to share! I’m going to kind of keep these a little relaxed because I don’t want to put too much pressure on myself and as 2020 showed us, you never know what is going to happen. I just want these to guide me, not confine me.

1. Read 100 books.

I have done this consistently 3 years in a row, so I don’t think it’ll be a problem. This is not a huge deal to me, but there are a ton of books I want to read, so I do think I’ll get there naturally.

2. Review books soon after finishing them.

I need to get better about reviewing books within a few days of finishing them. Books I have neutral feelings about slip out of my mind after that long, so it makes it very difficult to review them! Also, hopefully doing this will mean that I don’t have to scramble to meet my posting schedule.

3. Read series quickly.

If I start (and enjoy) a series that is already finished or has more books out, I am begging myself to quickly read them. It doesn’t have to be back to back, but I’m tired of drawing out series for months or years.

4. Contemplate books before blindly buying them.

There are too many books that I get that I end up not even really knowing what they are about. I just want to look into them a bit more. Sometimes it is fun to pick a book with only a little information, but when half of my TBR is that way, it can end up feeling like a waste of time.


That’s it! Basically I just want to read good books. What goals do you have this year?

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faeryreads’ 2020 Book Awards!

It’s time for my book awards!! I had so much fun doing this last year, so I was really looking forward to doing it again this year! These are all based on my opinions and my overall thoughts on each book. Here’s how I broke things up into categories:
1. 2020 releases
2. Best of each Genre
3. Miscellaneous awards (like saddest book)

It’s time for my book awards!! I had so much fun doing this last year, so I was really looking forward to doing it again this year! These are all based on my opinions and my overall thoughts on each book. Here’s how I broke things up into categories:
1. 2020 releases
2. Best of each Genre
3. Miscellaneous awards (like saddest book)

Here we go! Only books released in 2020 were considered for these categories.

Technically, I’ll Be The One isn’t Lyla Lee’s first book, but it is her first YA book…I’m counting that because I freaking adored this book! It follows a plus-sized, bisexual girl who wants to become a KPop star even though the world tells her she’s not “normal” enough.

I just thoroughly enjoyed Vicious Spirits! I was a little unsure about it because it’s a “companion” to the first book in the series, but once I started reading about the Korean mythology and the character growth, I was sucked in.

Hands down, without a doubt, possibly the best series ending I’ve ever read! I’m not even kidding, The Empire of Gold was exactly what I want in an ending.

I don’t think I actually read too many series beginnings released this year, but From Blood and Ash is definitely one of the ones I’m most excited to continue! I love the heavy focus on romance, but also the fantasy elements.

The cover of The Kingdom of Back is just stunning! While I didn’t absolutely love the book itself, I’m in love with this cover. It follows Motzart and his sister through their childhood.

This is pretty simple: I’m just picking my favorite books in various genres, regardless of year published!

I just freaking adored The Queen of Blood! The sequel, The Reluctant Queen, was also amazing! This series is the right mix of nostalgia and freshness, while also having a setting and characters I really love.

I didn’t really read many science fiction books, so there weren’t many contenders, but A Closed and Common Orbit was still excellent! It explored a lot of themes around what it means to be human and family that I really enjoyed.

This book was just so cute! As soon as I read Get a Life, Chloe Brown, I immediately needed to read more by Talia Hibbert. She has a way of writing such adorable romances with still including all different types of people that you might not see in a typical romance.

I couldn’t believe how much I loved The Downstairs Girl! It takes a look at post-Civil War Atlanta and discusses racism and sexism, yet is still such a light, fun, cute story.

Invisible Women is one of the first non-memoir non-fiction books I’ve read and it made me so mad! Maybe I’ll stick to memoirs, I don’t need to know real facts.

I had to turn this into a category that includes manga, because I read the entire Fullmetal Alchemist manga and I loved it! I’ve seen both anime multiple times, so I knew I would love it, but it just felt so good to see these characters again.

New category this year! I ended up reading a lot of books that weren’t necessarily romance (even though most of them contained it), so I decided to make a contemporary category. The Switch was so good and heartwarming! It was one I was really looking forward to, so it didn’t disappoint.

A category for random awards! The fun ones, in my opinion. (Also, some of these are negative, no shade if you liked the books I didn’t)

Not that I was expecting to dislike this book, but it took me by surprise! The whole Rebel of the Sands series was overall so good. It was definitely a rebellion story, but it had some very cool twists, intriguing magic, and a romance that I loved.

Oof…this book. I get angry every time I scroll past Love at First Like on my Goodreads. The main character was such a manipulative person and the plot was just…bad.

Winter Garden…so many things about this book made me so freaking sad, especially the ending. Anything World War II is always extra sad to me, but man, I’m definitely not rereading this one because I can’t handle crying like that again.

Tessa Dare is definitely a new favorite I discovered in 2020! I read 7 of her books, I think, and I pretty much enjoyed them.

I was SO disappointed by this book, especially because Serpent & Dove was so fun and it won one of my awards last year. Blood & Honey was just…not what I wanted.

Kim Jiyoung, Born 1982 was definitely a book that stood out to me! Not only was it so impactful and kickstarted the #MeToo movement in South Korea, but it was also one of the first translated books I’ve read. It was a very interesting mix of fiction and fact.

I did read this right at the beginning of 2020, but I could not tell you what happened in Goldenhand. I overall enjoyed the rest of this series, but this one was a miss for me.

I don’t know if I should say who it is for the sake of spoilers? If you’ve read it, you know. I read the first two books in The Bone Season series this year. The romance doesn’t start out as romance, but I liked the tension between them the whole time. The relationship is being developed slowly over this series and I love that slowburn.

I didn’t really read many standalones this year, but Girl, Serpent, Thorn was a good time! It ended up being different than I expected, but I loved the themes the author weaves through her stories.

Here we are, at the last award! Best read of the year, out of 123 books, is Fireborne! I listened to this book on audio and stayed up so late to keep listening because I just could not get enough. The complexity of the characters themselves, as well as their relationship to each other was so good. I can’t wait for the sequel to come out soon, and I also can’t wait to reread this book in preparation of that release!


That’s it for this year’s book awards!! Do you agree with any of these choices?

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2020 Reading Statistics!

Happy 2021!! I love doing end of the year/beginning of the year posts, and yearly stats are so interesting for me! I love a look into how and what I read. Here are all the books I read:

Happy 2021!! I love doing end of the year/beginning of the year posts, and yearly stats are so interesting for me! I love a look into how and what I read. Here are all the books I read:

Basic Stats

Total books read: 123

Total pages read: 49,610

Average book length: 403

Longest: Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson (1,243 pages)

Shortest: Dewdrop by Katie O’Neill (40 pages)

Highest Rated: Fullmetal Alchemist omnibus vol. 9 by Hiromu Arakawa (4.76 on Goodreads)

Lowest Rated: Love at First Like by Hannah Orenstein (2.99 on Goodreads)

I dropped 2 books this year, which is maybe an all time low.

I finished 7 series.

I started 28 series, 11 of which I won’t be continuing with.

Graphs

My audiobook listening absolutely spiked this year, mostly due to the pandemic. I had a hard time physically reading, but I found a bunch of hobbies (cross stitch, mini DIY houses, Animal Crossing) that I could do while listening to books.

I read 43 books that were published in 2020…seems pretty wild to me, not going to lie! I think I had a pretty good balance between reading new releases and backlist titles, though I didn’t really read many old books.

I still read a majority YA, but this is the most even YA and adult has been for me so far! It takes less time for me to read one YA book compared to one adult book, so I think YA will stay on top.

No surprise, I mostly read fantasy. Sci-fi went down (only read 3 sci-fi books this year) and romance and thrillers (which is a loose thriller/mystery/horror category) both went up.

Finally, we have books per month and pages per month! I think I am one of the only people who had a very productive April, in terms of reading (though I did crash in May lol). That’s largely due to reading a ton of graphic novels at work when I had nothing to do for hours on end.


How was your reading year in 2020? Happy 2021!

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